Naltrexone-induced dysphoria
in former opioid addicts

by
Crowley TJ, Wagner JE, Zerbe G, Macdonald M.
Am J Psychiatry. 1985 Sep;142(9):1081-4.


ABSTRACT

Naltrexone treatment, used to prevent relapse among former opioid addicts, is reported to have an extraordinary rate of noncompliance. Since activation of opioid receptors produces a sense of well-being, naltrexone's blockade of these receptors might produce dysphoria, which could contribute to noncompliance among addicts under treatment. To test this hypothesis, the authors administered naltrexone to four men who had been free of opioids for 9 to 44 months using a 6-week, placebo-controlled crossover design. One subject dropped out with abstinence-like symptoms, and two others reported mild but significantly greater dysphoria during naltrexone administration. The results suggest that naltrexone may induce mild dysphoria long after addicts stop using opioids.
Pain
'Vivitrex'
Morphine
Tramadol
Naloxone
Nociceptin
Oxycodone
6beta-naltrexol
Naltrexone: suicide risk?
Ultra-low-dose naltrexone
Naltrexone plus buprenorphine
Naltrexone (Trexan) : structure
Naltrexone to treat fibromyalgia
Naltrexone (Trexan) and sexual addicts
Can low-dose naltrexone improve quality of life?


Refs
and further reading

HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
Cocaine.org
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhapiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World

The Good Drug Guide
The Good Drug Guide

The Responsible Parent's Guide
To Healthy Mood Boosters For All The Family