Molecular biology of opioid analgesia
by
Pasternak GW.
Laboratory of Molecular Neuropharmacology
and Department of Neurology,
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center,
New York, New York, USA.
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2005 May;29(5 Suppl):2-9


ABSTRACT

Opioids provide excellent pain relief in most patients. Yet the responses of patients to individual opioids can vary markedly, even among the mu opioids. Understanding this variability would greatly enhance our ability to treat patients appropriately. Classical pharmacological studies have long implied the existence of multiple subtypes of mu opioid receptors. More recently, a number of variants of the cloned mu opioid receptor have been described. These variants all show the same selectivity for mu opioids, confirming their classification as mu opioid receptors. Yet, they differ in their functional activation by opioids as well as in their localization within cells and regions in the brain. These multiple mu opioid receptors may help explain the range of responses seen clinically among patients for the various opioid drugs.
Mu3
SOD Mu
Naloxonazine
Endomorphins
Dihydroetorphine
Receptor subtypes
Mu : gender and age
Morphine/verapamil
Fentanyl and ketamine
Dynorphin and dopamine
Genes, pharmacology and mu
Depression, opioids and the HPA
Kappa upregulation and addiction
Mice without mu don't miss their moms
Mu-opioid receptors, drugs and reward
Opioids, depression and learned helplessness
Genetic polymorphism of mu opioid peptide receptor (MOP)
The mu-opioid receptor system and the physiological regulation of emotion


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