The self-medication hypothesis of addictive
disorders: focus on heroin and cocaine dependence

by
Khantzian EJ
Am J Psychiatry 1985 Nov;142(11):1259-64


ABSTRACT

Recent clinical observations and psychiatric diagnostic findings of drug-dependent individuals suggest that they are predisposed to addiction because they suffer with painful affect states and related psychiatric disorders. The drugs that addicts select are not chosen randomly. Their drug of choice is the result of an interaction between the psychopharmacologic action of the drug and the dominant painful feelings with which they struggle. Narcotic addicts prefer opiates because of their powerful muting action on the disorganizing and threatening affects of rage and aggression. Cocaine has its appeal because of its ability to relieve distress associated with depression, hypomania, and hyperactivity.
Pain
Fentanyl
Tolerance
Heroin Inc
Poppy tea
Dutch heroin
Intranasal heroin
Heroin v morphine
Intravenous heroin
The extended amygdala
The poppy-seed defence
Heroin, GABAA and the NAcc
Baclofen, dopamine and heroin
Methadone, morphine and heroin


Refs
and further reading

HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
erythroxylum-coca.com
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhapiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World

The Good Drug Guide
The Good Drug Guide

The Responsible Parent's Guide
To Healthy Mood Boosters For All The Family