Pharmacology of Amphibian Opiate Peptides(1).
by
Negri L, Melchiorri P, Lattanzi R
Department of Human Physiology and Pharmacology,
University "La Sapienza,"
P.le Aldo Moro, 5,
I-00185, Rome, Italy
Peptides 2000 Nov 1;21(11):1639-1647


ABSTRACT

In 1980 the skin of certain frogs belonging to the genus Phyllomedusinae was found to contain two new peptides that proved to be selective mu-opioid agonists, and named dermorphins. Since 1987 deltorphins, a family of highly selective delta-opioid peptides were identified either by cloning of the cDNA from frog skins or isolation of the peptides. The distinctive feature of opioid peptides is the presence of a naturally occurring D-enantiomer at the second position in their common N-terminal sequence, Tyr-D-Xaa-Phe. The discovery of the amphibian opiate peptides, provided new insights into the functional role of the mu- and delta-opiate systems. It also provided models for novel analgesics with enhanced therapeutic benefits and reduced toxicity.
Pain
Frogs
Morphine
Tramadol
Why itch?
Endomorphins
P-glycoprotein
Morphine worms
Discounting rewards
Opioids, dopamine and alcohol
Opioids, goldfish and the giant toad
Heroin, cocaine and the squirrel monkey


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